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Report: Latest concussion could end Jordan Reed’s career

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Dallas Cowboys v Washington Redskins Photo by Scott Taetsch/Getty Images

Jordan Reed’s NFL career has been a mix of spectacular play, and disappointing injuries. He was drafted by the Redskins in the 3rd round of the 2013 draft. He has never played more than 14 games in a season, and never started more than 8 games despite being the #1 TE for years. Injuries have hit him every year, but concussions could finally end his time in the NFL.

People have voiced their concerns for Jordan Reed’s long-term health after every concussion he has had in his college and NFL career(7 documented). He has admitted to hiding symptoms in an attempt to continue playing. Adam Schefter reported this morning that there is growing concern in the Redskins organization, and around the NFL that his latest concussion could end his career.

There are those within the Redskins organization and around the league who are concerned Reed will not be able to play again, according to sources. Reed will continue to undergo testing, but the player, the team and doctors know what he is up against.

I wrote about Jordan Reed’s issues with concussions, his refusal to wear any type of special helmet, and his concern with the increasing amount of time it was taking to return from each new concussion...5 years ago. It feels like it’s time for Reed to retire, but if it’s left to him he will continue playing until he is forced out of the league.

After being diagnosed with a concussion, Reed attempted to play the following week against the San Francisco 49ers, and again a week after that against the New York Giants, before coming to terms with the severity of the injury.

Some games, I wasn’t being completely honest in telling them how bad [the symptoms] were, so that was kind of why I was able to come back [to practice] and then getting kicked out again,” Reed said.

For Reed, those symptoms included severe headaches in the morning and at night, nausea, and an inability to sleep.

”I started to get a little scared after about two months - like, ‘Maybe I’m going to be like this forever,’ or something like that,” Reed said. “But it ended up going away.”