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Is Tight End the Redskins Offensive Missing Link?

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NFL: New York Giants at Washington Redskins Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports

While scrolling through Twitter today, I came across this piece by JP Finlay talking about how much money the Redskins had wrapped up in the tight end spot...

19 million this year alone, and for what?

- a guaranteed mysterious toe injury from our starter?

- more dropped passes by our back-up?...like this

- poor blocking...by all of them?


Tight end may be one of the positions the Redskins are hurting at the most on offense - yes, possibly even more than wide receiver.

It’s not only the massive amount of money tied up in the position; it’s the limited production.

Last year, despite his massive salary, Jordan Reed produced just 558 receiving yards which ranked 15th among tight ends. His two touchdowns tied him with Vernon Davis for the team lead among the position group - which isn’t saying much!

Together, Reed and Davis, whose combined 2018 salaries exceeded $15 million, totaled 79 catches for 925 receiving yards and four touchdowns last year.

Not bad numbers for one player, right?


Throughout his six year career, Reed, who will turn 29 this summer, has never played a full 16-game season. The closest he’s come was in 2015 when he played in 14 games and set career highs in receptions (87), yards (952) and touchdowns (11). He’s never come close to those numbers since, and given his age and injury history, it’s likely he never will.

Davis, who up until last year had managed to escape Father Time, had his best year in D.C. in 2017, hauling in 43 receptions for 648 yards and three touchdowns. He turned 35 in January, and the clock is just not going back any further. He’s still a great teammate, consummate professional and leader in the community, but he’s not helping this team win many football games.

Behind these two vets, the cupboard is bare.

Jeremy Sprinkle is a situational tight end who wouldn’t scare most high school defensive coordinators, and JP Holtz and Matt Flanagan are more H-Backs and special teams contributors than complete tight ends.

This begs the question - what should the Redskins do at the position?


There are a few different options:

-First, the team could ride out 2019 with Reed, Davis and Sprinkle and hope to improve via the draft or free agency in 2020.

-Second, they could trade a conditional pick in 2020 for a veteran tight end. One name that come to mind is the Vikings Kyle Rudolph (29). Rudolph has had four consecutive seasons of 16 games played. He’s a solid blocker, and still has the ability to stretch the field vertically. He has scored 24 touchdowns in the last four seasons. I would even consider at least inquiring with Baltimore about Hayden Hurst (who seems to have fallen behind Andrews and Boyle on the Ravens depth chart), although they may be reluctant to move the 2018 first rounder.

-Finally, the Skins could wait until final roster cuts, and see if anyone they think can help is looking for a job.


The Redskins need to improve the tight end position one way or another. How and when they choose to do so could be instrumental for this offense and rookie quarterback Dwayne Haskins.

Poll

What should the Redskins do about the tight end position?

This poll is closed

  • 33%
    Roll with what they have in 2019 and wait for next year to upgrade
    (292 votes)
  • 15%
    Trade for a veteran
    (134 votes)
  • 51%
    Wait until final cuts and see who becomes available
    (457 votes)
883 votes total Vote Now