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Redskins Put in Tough Spot by Jessica McCloughan Tweet

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Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports

Just when you thought things couldn't get any worse in Redskins Nation, they did. Yesterday, reports surfaced, and were later confirmed, of a tweet sent by Jessica McCloughan, wife of Redskins GM Scot McCloughan accusing ESPN reporter Dianna Russini of providing sexual favors in return for stories. The Redskins originally denied the tweet was from Jessica McCloughan, insisting the account from which the tweet was sent was a fake, and that they had turned it over to NFL security to investigate. However, later, the team issues this statement:

"I deeply apologize for the disparaging remarks about an ESPN reporter on my personal Twitter account. The comment was unfounded and inappropriate, and I have the utmost respect for both the reporter and ESPN. I regret that my actions have brought undeserved negative attention to the Redskins organization and its leadership. My comments in no way reflect the opinions or attitudes of the organization and I regret that my behavior has in any way negatively impacted the team and its loyal fan base." – Jessica McCloughan

Seeing that there was quite a bit of gray area surrounding this story, I reached out to Tony Wyllie for clarification. Tony got back to me promptly, but as you can see below, his response provided no closure on the situation:

Email exchange:

Tony,
Good morning. I am a writer for SB Nation. I am trying to run a story on our Redskins site about the miscommunication that occurred yesterday with Scots wife and the tweet. I imagine you had a very rough day yesterday, and I apologize for contacting you on such a sour note, but I had a few questions I was hoping you would be gracious enough to clear up for me:

1) It was reported by the orginazation that the account was originally a fake, and that it was turned in to NFL security, but later this was recanted by the orginazation as Mrs. McCloughan admitted the account was hers. Did you receive this information about the account being hers from Scot, or his wife?

2) Who first told the team that the account was a fake, and how soon after the tweet went public was this relayed to you.

3) Is the incident currently under investigation by the team, and if so, for what reasons?

4) It is apparent that someone lied here. Are you able to share where the miscommunication may have originated, and why the team was so quick to issue a statement saying the account was a fake before gathering appropriate information.


Many thanks for your responses. 


Regards,

Mark Tyler
Writer/Editor
SBNation
xxx-xxx-xxxx
Tony Wyllie to you
Mark

I will send this statement and leave it at that

"I deeply apologize for the disparaging remarks about an ESPN reporter on my personal Twitter account. The comment was unfounded and inappropriate, and I have the utmost respect for both the reporter and ESPN. I regret that my actions have brought undeserved negative attention to the Redskins organization and its leadership. My comments in no way reflect the opinions or attitudes of the organization and I regret that my behavior has in any way negatively impacted the team and its loyal fan base." – Jessica McCloughan

Sent from my iPhone
Me to Tony WyllieSent
I understand. Thank you for the reply. 

Sent from my iPhone





So, as speculation runs rampant, will the public ever find out what what truly went down(no pun intended) with this latest blunder, and can the Redskins put all this in the rear view mirror, and begin to focus on the upcoming season?

We all want answers, but could we actually be better off without them? For once, maybe saying nothing at all would be better than trying to do damage control.