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The History of the Redskins' 2nd & 3rd Round Picks and at Number 38 & 69 Overall

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Examining what the careers of the average Redskins' 2nd & 3rd Round selections and the 38th & 69th overall pick look like

Mike Powell/Getty Images

If you read yesterday's first-round version, then you already know the drill.  Here's a quick primer for those that didn't.

Below you will find a list of every Redskins' second and third-round pick, every 38th and 69th overall pick and all of the instances in which the 38th and 69th selections were traded in the last 20 years.  Each player's number of years as his team's primary starter, number of Pro Bowls and number of All Pro selections are listed.

Here are the averages for all of the Redskins' second-round picks dating back to the first draft in 1936.

2nd Round Averages Starter Years Pro Bowls All Pros Career AV
All Players Average 2.7
0.4 0.1
17.7

The numbers and percentages in the table below reflect the number of players that achieved these accolades and not the total number produced by the entire population of Redskins round-one picks.

2nd Round Percentages 4-Year Starters Pro Bowlers All Pros Hall of Famers
Group Total 18 9 1 1
All Players % 34.6% 17.3% 1.9% 1.9%

The Redskins don't really have a great track record in the second round of the draft.  The only All Pro and Hall of Famer that the team ever acquired with their 52 all-time second-round selections was defensive back Paul Krause (1964).  Washington foolishly parted ways with Krause after just four seasons.

The 38th overall pick also hasn't been very kind to the Redskins either, despite the fact that they always seem to end up with it.

Of the draft's 79 selections made with the number 38 pick, the Redskins have made ten of them (13%).  No other team has used this pick more than Washington has.  The only one that the Redskins have used more frequently themselves is the 148th overall selection, which they've drafted players with 11 times.

Unfortunately, they' have not had much success at 38, despite numerous chances to get it right.  Their picks of Dick Todd (1939) and Tom Roussel (1968) are the only picks that can be considered relatively quality selections at number 38 overall.

38th Pick Averages Starter Years Pro Bowls All Pros Career AV
All Players Average 2.6 0.5 0.2 22.7
38th Pick Percentages 4-Year Starters Pro Bowlers All Pros Hall of Famers
All Player Totals 27 15 6 1
All Players % 34.2% 19.0% 7.6% 1.3%

Yesterday, we saw that the four-year starter and Pro Bowl percentages for the number five overall pick were about 55% and 45% respectively.  It should come as no surprise that the hit rate drops considerably when we look at the results over 30 picks later into the draft.

Mike Singletary was the only Hall of Famer to ever be selected with the number 38 overall pick in the draft.

The 3rd Round, the #69 Pick and the King of the Hogs

Look at the number 69 selection in the 1981 draft and you will see how one of the greatest Redskins of all-time was acquired.  In what was likely the best draft in Redskins' history, Bobby Beathard selected future Hall of Famer and the leader of Hogs, Russ Grimm.

3rd Round Averages Starter Years Pro Bowls All Pros Career AV
All Players Average 1.9 0.4 0.1 15.9
3rd Round Percentages 4-Year Starters Pro Bowlers All Pros Hall of Famers
Group Total 16 10 4 1
All Players % 26.2% 16.4% 6.6% 1.6%

The Redskins arguably have had more success in the third round than in the second, at least relative to expectations.  They selected three more All Pros in the third round, only one less Pro Bowler and they actually held onto the Hall of Famer that they drafted in this round.

However, it should be noted that the team has had nine more picks in the third round than in the second (61 vs. 52 selections).

Coincidentally, the 69th pick is the one that the team used to select Grimm with.  If only they could be so lucky again this year.

The team's other four picks at 69 didn't fare nearly as well however.  Running Back Skip Hicks was the best of the four, and he only had a modest career as a backup.

69th Pick Averages Start Years Pro Bowls All Pros Career AV
All Players Average 1.7 0.3 0.2 13.1
69th Pick Percentages 4-Year Starters Pro Bowlers All Pros Hall of Famers
All Player Totals 12 8 4 3
All Players % 15.2% 10.1% 5.1% 3.8%

Mid Round Trade Town

Here are lists that show every time that the 38th and 69th overall picks were traded since 1994, when the current seven-round format was adopted for the draft.  You can see more information here and here on PFR.

#38
Date From Traded To Received
4/26/2013 Arizona Cardinals 2013 2nd round pick (38th overall, Manti Te'o) San Diego Chargers 2013 2nd round pick (45th overall, Kevin Minter)




2013 4th round pick (110th overall subsequently traded, Ryan Nassib)
4/26/2008 Baltimore Ravens 2008 2nd round pick (38th overall, John Carlson) Seattle Seahawks 2008 2nd round pick (55th overall, Ray Rice)




2008 3rd round pick (86th overall, Tom Zbikowski)
4/28/2007 Arizona Cardinals 2007 2nd round pick (38th overall, Zach Miller) Oakland Raiders 2007 2nd round pick (33rd overall, Alan Branch)


2007 4th round pick (105th overall subsequently traded, A.J. Davis)

4/24/2004 Atlanta Falcons 2004 2nd round pick (38th overall subsequently traded, Ricardo Colclough) Indianapolis Colts 2004 1st round pick (29th overall, Michael Jenkins)


2004 3rd round pick (69th overall, Gilbert Gardner)
2004 3rd round pick (90th overall, Matt Schaub)


2004 4th round pick (125th overall, Jason David)

4/24/2004 Indianapolis Colts 2004 2nd round pick (38th overall, Ricardo Colclough) Pittsburgh Steelers 2004 2nd round pick (44th overall, Bob Sanders)




2004 4th round pick (107th overall, Kendyll Pope)
4/19/1997 St. Louis Rams 1997 2nd round pick (38th overall, John Allred) Chicago Bears 1997 2nd round pick (40th overall, Dexter McCleon)




1997 6th round pick (173rd overall subsequently traded, Mike Crawford)

#69
Date From Traded To Received
4/27/2012 Washington Redskins 2012 3rd round pick (69th overall, T.J. Graham) Buffalo Bills 2012 3rd round pick (71st overall, Josh LeRibeus)
2012 7th round pick (217th overall, Jordan Bernstine)
4/27/2008 New England Patriots 2008 3rd round pick (69th overall, Jacob Hester) San Diego Chargers 2008 5th round pick (160th overall subsequently traded, Josh Johnson)
2009 2nd round pick (47th overall subsequently traded, Michael Mitchell)
4/27/2008 Cleveland Browns 2009 3rd round pick (69th overall, Jason Williams) Dallas Cowboys 2008 4th round pick (111th overall, Martin Rucker)
4/28/2007 Oakland Raiders 2007 7th round pick (211th overall, Oscar Lua) New England Patriots 2007 3rd round pick (91st overall, Mario Henderson)
2008 3rd round pick (69th overall subsequently traded, Jacob Hester)
4/24/2004 Atlanta Falcons 2004 2nd round pick (38th overall subsequently traded, Ricardo Colclough) Indianapolis Colts 2004 1st round pick (29th overall, Michael Jenkins)
2004 3rd round pick (69th overall, Gilbert Gardner) 2004 3rd round pick (90th overall, Matt Schaub)
2004 4th round pick (125th overall, Jason David)
4/20/2002 Buffalo Bills 2002 3rd round pick (69th overall, Saleem Rasheed) San Francisco 49ers 2002 2nd round pick (61st overall, Ryan Denney)
2002 4th round pick (102nd overall, Jeff Chandler)
4/21/2001 New England Patriots 2001 3rd round pick (69th overall, Eric Kelly) Minnesota Vikings 2001 3rd round pick (86th overall, Brock Williams)
2001 4th round pick (119th overall, Jabari Holloway)
4/17/1997 New Orleans Saints 1997 5th round pick (132nd overall, Jamel Williams) Washington Redskins Heath Shuler
1998 3rd round pick (69th overall, Skip Hicks)

The last time the Redskins possessed the 69th overall selection was in 2012, when they traded down with the Bills and used their newly acquired picks to select Josh LeRibeus and Jordan Bernstine.  The Bills ended up with receiver T.J. Graham.  So far, it appears that Buffalo may have gotten the slightly better end of that deal.

Finally, we see where the Redskins attempted to salvage whatever perceived value still remained for the former number three overall pick Heath Shuler by trading him to the Saints.  Shuler's career only lasted ten more games, so it was definitely a decent deal for Washington.